Patience and Time

At yoga class we end each session with a lovely lie down and some of us nod off… Our teacher brings us back into the real world with some words of yogi wisdom pertinent to the day’s theme – this week we were concentrating on our breathing – and she spoke to us about Patience and Time. Being patient in your yoga practice is important – don’t expect to be super-bendy straight away and don’t expect to get the breathing right immediately. It all takes time. I like these little readings; they make me feel all floaty and calm after 80 minutes of exhausting stretching and bending.

I do have a tendency to worry (if I’m honest, I have been known to flap) and am prone to impetuosity, so yoga does wonders for me physically and mentally. Gardening also helps. Wise gardeners (it is a long-term goal of mine to become one) know a thing or two about patience and time. Planning, biding your time, waiting for good things to come. Some years it seems as though winter goes on for ages and you wait and wait for spring to come. This year is all topsy turvy – plants bloomed and lasted far longer than usual last autumn and now they’re getting all ahead of themselves with spring. My patience is not to be tested, it seems.

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Grape hyacinths (Muscari) are starting to pop out all over the place. They are flowering at least a month earlier than last year.
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This little hardy geranium (unknown – any ideas?) has started flowering already.
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Our snowdrops are out. These clumps and drifts are such a heart-swelling sight. I reckon they’ll be at their peak in a week or so – they are possibly a week or so earlier than this time last year.
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Now these babies are ridiculously early. The tulips were only just peeking out of the soil at the end of February last year. Some are way over 10cm tall already and I wonder if they’ll flower early. I hope not. Tulips are definitely worth waiting for. I planted the wallflowers as plugs in November and they’re filling out nicely.
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More snowdrops and pots of Iris reticulata ‘Harmony’ back left, and pots of stray Muscari by the wall. The irises were on sale – three pots for £5 – outside a florist yesterday and I couldn’t walk past them. Once they’ve flowered, I’ll plant them somewhere sunny where we can look forward to their beautiful blooms next winter.
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Ok, I need help with this one please. Yes, I know it’s a snowdrop(!) but it’s enormous. The flowers are about 3cm long, the leaves are much broader and longer than the common snowdrops elsewhere in the garden and it’s growing separately. I’ve had a look through books and on the internet and I think it might be a variety of Galanthus plicatum. Any suggestions? Thank you.

 

 

 

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39 thoughts on “Patience and Time

  1. I love the parallel you draw between yoga and gardening. And I’m SO envious of your gardening skills. Oh, and 80 MINUTES of yoga? I can’t even imagine. 80 minutes of any kind of exercise just boggles my mind.

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  2. It was the lie down at the end that put me off yoga; far from nodding off, I was mentally checking my watch and planning the day ahead. Everything is way ahead here – I wonder if we’re going to get a bare stretch a few weeks hence. Sounds as though you need to visit the national snowdrop collection.

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    1. It’s taken me a while to be able to zone out and some weeks I have too much whizzing around my brain. But it’s good for me. Yes, it’ll be interesting to see what happens with bloom timings, etc this spring.

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  3. Hmm. the snowdrop. Could you tell us how tall the flower stem is and the leaves are? They vary so much and there are so many different varieties although not as many with as big a flower as this. Does it have a silvery stripe on the leaves? If you say you wondered if it was G plicatus does that mean you noticed the leaves had folded edges as they emerged? Sorry about all the questions!

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    1. I’ve just been outside to measure it and take some more photos. The flower stems are about 26cm long, as are the leaves. These are broad – from 1.5 to 2cm wide and they appear to all be slightly curved at the tips. There are two plants growing out of a bank so it’s hard to find the bases but I think the leaves are coming out curled lengthways. There’s no silver stripe. Shall I email you the photos? Thank you Cathy 🙂

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      1. That’s pretty tall, isn’t it? Yes please, do email photos (email address should be visible in your ‘comments’ if you look at them via the My Sites button on the top left) of your blog. It is sounding as if it might be a G plicatus, (which hybridises freely with the more common G elwesii and nivalis) although this usually have a silvery stripe on the leaf

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  4. I do miss my Monday night yoga – especially the nodding off during relaxation at the end! I used to walk home, often under a starry sky, and my husband always had pasta amatriciana ready to eat accompanied by a glass of red wine. My teacher retired in 2011 and I’d been going to her classes for 20 years. I do practise at home, especially when my back is achy after a lot of gardening, but it’s not the same as going to a class. Occasionally I do a session at the leisure centre but she plays music (!) and there is no relaxation or words of wisdom as the next students are waiting to come in. I tried two terms of Pilates last year which tbh I found a bit pointless. You’ve made me want to investigate local yoga classes again but it is hard to find a teacher you like and trust. I think your geranium may be G. Maccrorhizum (mine has been flowering throughout the winter too).

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    1. Perhaps there will be a good class near your new cottage? I hope you find one – it’s such a brilliant way to keep supple. I agree that it’s important to find a teacher who’s method you like and trust, though. I couldn’t be doing with music(!) and you definitely need the relaxation at the end. Good luck. I think you’re right about the geranium – thank you.

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  5. Also very impressed with 80 minutes of yoga! I did yoga for a while and I always fell asleep at the end. We were supposed to be still and silent yet aware of everything around us. I failed on the last bit. I’m also incredibly impatient, yoga and gardening haven’t cured that yet! CJ xx

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  6. Such important lessons Sam! I’m not sure what that flower is…I’m a bit stumped by its foliage. Let us know when you solve the mystery! And I’m speechless that you have all of this Beauty coming through already! I have a feeling we will be having an early spring as well but we won’t be seeing much for another month. Enjoy your pretty garden friend! Nicole xo

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  7. Oh I know what you mean about that lovely bit at the end of a yoga session. I get the same effect from practicing mindfulness mediation, which I love to do but don’t make time for as often as would be good for me.
    Your garden looks wonderful, such an inspiration! We had some new fencing put in this week, so now I have no excuse not to finally get to grips with a very shabby-looking border – starting with snowdrop planting!

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  8. I used to do Tai Chi and we also relaxed at the end. Our teacher told us to follow our thoughts
    rather than not to think, which seemed to work well. Gardeners are perhaps pacient when it comes to growing seeds and taking cuttings but rather impatient when it comes to wanting the new season to begin. Christina

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  9. First we need to be sure that the snowdrop is plicatus and not elwesii. I can’ t tell from the photo. Plicatus leaves have a conspicuous folding of the leaves. Do the leaves have a fold, almost a channel in the middle? They are also waxy. Elwesii leaves are broad and glaucous. The outermost leaves wrap round the inner ones.

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  10. I do need to practice both patience and time in life and in the garden! We have been out on a snowdrop walk this afternoon. The appearance of snow drops is always a welcome sight reminding me that spring is just around the corner. Sarah x

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  11. At some point I would like to do yoga. No time at present, but it is in my mind. It sounds a good and balancing thing to give time to. I cultivate patience better with wild things than people things! Love all your plants- such vibrant and fresh greens. X

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    1. The natural world can teach us all a thing or two about patience. But yoga does help with my clattering mind and not-so-young-any-more limbs – I highly recommend it when you have the time x

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  12. I didn’t think that I would like yoga at all. But I decided to try it before we went on our year-long RV trip, because it was something I could do in a smallish space, by myself. I did it some on my own that year, but also took classes when we stayed in places for a few weeks or months. I was astonished at how much I loved it and looked forward to it. Now that we are settled down again, it’s become an integral part of my life. It’s such a wonderful way to stay strong and limber. And it has helped calm my constantly whirring mind.
    Your snowdrops are spectacular. We had an unexpected 12″ snow drop here last night (the forecast was for 2-3″). With patience, eventually, we will have snowdrops like yours!
    Brenda

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    1. I had a similar thought before I started yoga and now I absolutely love it too. Crikey – 12″ snow overnight! That’d bring the UK to a complete standstill. Hope you’re ok. We are enjoying the results of the efforts of whoever planted our snowdrops probably many ago. They spread around the garden as we dig plants up and move them, etc, and it’s a joy to discover where they pop up each year.

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  13. So interesting to read your thoughts on yoga, and your commenters’ thoughts too. I am starting yoga for the first time in a couple of weeks in our village hall, just one session a week, I am looking forward to it. I am hoping it will improve my posture, stretch out my back, and help my concentration!

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    1. It’s important to find a teacher whose method you like and trust, but it’s the best way to keep supple, poised(!) and calm that I’ve come across. Hope you enjoy it.

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  14. Your Snowdrops look great, but I have no ideas for the ID. Our first snowdrops have emerged and may bloom in a week or so. Gardening is great for relaxation. I’ve never done yoga but I have used an online meditation program called Headspace, though I tend to fall asleep.

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  15. Hi. Just came across your blog – what a lovely discovery. So true about patience and gardening. I am not very patient especially with gardening. We moved last summer and i am treated to constant surprises through the year in the garden including lots of delightful tiny snowdrops. The result of someone else’s hard work and patience!

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    1. Hello Helen, welcome. It’s definitely a good idea to see a new garden through a year to find out what treasures (and otherwise) there are before making any drastic changes. The snowdrops here were a lovely surprise in our first winter. Patience is something I’m constantly working on…

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