Risk assessment

Cassie at the top of the steps.
Cassie at the top of the steps.

 

Two gentlemen from the Garden Safari committee came to survey the garden yesterday. It was pouring with rain and blowing a gale – not ideal garden-viewing conditions. They looked with alarm at the piles of rubble, the steep steps, the new retaining walls with sheer drop, the pond, the trampoline and all the other ‘risks’ and made notes on their clipboards. ‘Have you got any poisonous plants?’, one asked. Oh crikey. I thought for a moment that they were going to strike us off the list and tell us our garden was too unsafe. But, no, it’s ok. We will have barriers and signs saying ‘Go no further’, ‘There’s nothing to see here’, or similar. We’ll be cordoning off the steep, terraced, ‘lots of work to do’ part and keeping visitors to the safer, flatter, and very luckily, better-looking part.

Steep steps, a sheer drop and part of the garden I've not introduced you to yet...
Steep steps, a sheer drop and part of the garden I’ve not introduced you to yet…
Work in progress and blue trug.
Work in progress and blue trug.

They were slightly aghast at our relaxed attitude. There is still so much to do! The date is fast-approaching! David and I looked at each other – ‘But it’s weeks away…’ we said. Perhaps we’re being over-confident but, as we’ve done so much since March, we’re sure there’s time to get it in a fit state for people to look at.

We spent the weekend clearing this border by the back garden wall. There's a plum and greengage (both requiring attention) and a Campsis radicans (trumpet vine) which we've cut back to encourage it to flower lower down. We've lots of plants to go in here.
We spent the weekend clearing this border by the back garden wall. There’s a plum and greengage (both requiring attention) and a Campsis radicans (trumpet vine) which we’ve cut back to encourage it to flower lower down. We’ve lots of plants to go in here when we’ve sorted out the edging.

There’s a whole heap of plants almost ready to go in to the newly revealed bed by the back wall and to fill gaps after the tulips have gone over. And the roses should be well into their flowering by then. Most of these were rescued from underneath overgrown shrubs in the front garden, so I’ve no idea what cultivar they are or what colour they’ll be! They’re in a sloping bed edged with box and also containing Miscanthus – a simple planting scheme but hopefully it’ll be looking pretty for the Safari at the end of June.

In any case, we’ll be serving afternoon teas with David’s scones, so it’ll be worth visiting just to sit and look at the sea and eat cake.

Box, roses and Miscanthus in the sloping bed by the path should be looking good by the end of June.
Box, roses and Miscanthus in the sloping bed by the path should be looking good by the end of June. It was full of white daffodils (Narcissus ‘Pheasant’s Eye’) earlier in the year – they lasted really well and their scent was gorgeous.
This one is flowering already.
This rose is flowering already.

 

Plants waiting to be moved to their new homes.
Plants waiting to be moved to their new homes.

photo-52

In other news… Two children are away this week – the youngest and the eldest (who is spending a lot of time away at the moment) are abroad on school trips. I’m missing them and the house is Very Quiet. Our self-contained middle child is tolerating the attention of both parents and enjoying having the computer all to himself. To take advantage of simpler logistics, we’re off to have a look at the Chelsea Flower Show on Thursday. I’ll try not to bombard you with too many photos.

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7 thoughts on “Risk assessment

  1. How awesome that you all will be having a garden walk! Just so outstanding! And all of your plants waiting to go in……That is exciting!!! Enjoy the flower show as that is such a treat! Can’t wait to see photos! Have a lovely week friend! Nicole xo

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  2. Fabulous wall. Does it matter if it isn’t all perfect and finished? I rather like looking around “work in progress” gardens. If nothing else, it gives me hope that I’m not the only one with a long list of to do chores.

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  3. It sounds like a lot of work but it will be beautiful when it’s fixed up. I love the first photo of Cassie on the steps. I have the same kind of asters growing in my front yard and I adore them. I think they are technically weeds – I know I didn’t plant them – but I like them too much to pull them out.

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